Implications of DKIM signing for DCC filtering?

Vernon Schryver vjs@calcite.rhyolite.com
Tue May 29 22:06:28 UTC 2007


> From: John L 

> > I can see a need for reputation ratings, along with whitelists and 
> > blacklists of domain names.  How much of this wil fit into DCC?
>
> Probably none.  DCC doesn't key anything by domain, does it?

there is DCC whitelisting by domain name.

> As you might suspect, the question of what you do with a DKIM signature 
> once you've verified it has come up before.
>
> Venal pitch: See, for example. http://www.domain-assurance.org

The trouble with all mail bonding schemes is the nature of the third
party.  Who controls the criteria for assuring the virtue of mail senders
and what keeps those criteria from changing?  This question is related
to the question of who costs of the providing the bonding, from salaries
and bandwidth to the court costs related to revoking bonds?  There are
or have been many mail bonding organizations.  As far as I know, all
except those run by unsolicited bulk email senders have not been very
profitable.  Most organizations that can justify paying to have the
virtue of their mail certified have significant problems with their
mail being rejected by spam filters, and so tend to obvious preferences.
There are never-spamming ESPs that can justify paying for a bond, but
there are also others.

The list of members of the Domain Assurance Council is classic 
http://www.domain-assurance.org/member-list.phtml
includes organizations that I trust to never send unsolicited bulk email
as well as other organizations that I think are otherwise.


Vernon Schryver    vjs@rhyolite.com



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