DCC markup question

Vernon Schryver vjs@calcite.rhyolite.com
Thu Dec 16 02:23:24 UTC 2004


> From: Chris <cpollock@earthlink.net>

> I guess markup is the correct term.  Anyway, I've a question in the 
> differences of the X-Spam-DCC line.  Most times I see this:
>
> X-Spam-DCC: dcc3mcgill cpollock 1275; Body=many Fuz1=many Fuz2=many
>
> which I assume is a server, then other times I see this:
>
> X-Spam-DCC:  cpollock 1074; Body=1 Fuz1=1 Fuz2=many
>
> Does this mean that the DCC server timed out before  the check was made?

Neither of those X-* header lines are of the sort generated by DCC
clients.  DCC header lines are described in the main DCC man page.
See http://www.dcc-servers.net/dcc/dcc.html#X-DCC-Headers

Either of the following might be DCC header lines:
    X-dcc3mcgill-DCC: cpollock 1275; Body=many Fuz1=many Fuz2=many
    X-DCC: cpollock 1074; Body=1 Fuz1=1 Fuz2=many

The first might be generated after a DCC client on the host named
cpollock reports a message to the DCC server with ID 1275 and brand
name dcc3mcgill, and the server responds with target counts of
"Many" for all three body checksums.

The second might be generated after a DCC client on the same host named
cpollock reports a message to the DCC server with ID 1074 and a null brand
name, and the server responds with target counts of 1 for two checksums
and "Many" for the third.

The DCC client on cpollock should use the fastest or closest working
DCC server based on recent average round trip times (RTTs).  A DCC
client's current values of average RTTs can be seen with `cdcc info`.
A DCC server's failure to answer, whether because it is slow or broken
or because something is eating packets in the network, is counted as
a very long round trip time.


Vernon Schryver    vjs@rhyolite.com



More information about the DCC mailing list

Contact vjs@rhyolite.com by mail or use the form.